Friday, August 12, 2005

Where The Streets Flow With Beer

Scott e-mails to report on a blow for freedom struck on behalf of Green Bay Packer fans:

The village of Ashwaubenon has corrected an ongoing injustice. Beginning on August 12th, 2005, drinking on the streets in the Lambeau Entertainment District will be permitted. Ashwaubenon is located near Lambeau Field and for years Packers fans were outcasts in this tiny community.

"They're always hassling us" slurred one green and gold clad victim who had trouble recalling his name. "They let people drink Cokes there, but they won't let us knock back a couple of the state beverages. They're always on our case."

Fortunately, we live in a country where justice prevails.


We learn more from a story in Wednesday's Green Bay Press-Gazette

ASHWAUBENON--The Village Board on Tuesday loosened its rules on open intoxicants near Lambeau Field--but that doesn't mean you should pop open a cold one for Thursday's preseason Packers game.

The board unanimously agreed to allow people to drink on sidewalks and in public parking lots in a designated Lambeau Field Entertainment District on Packers home game days and for other special events.

But beware--the new ordinance isn't official until it's published Friday. That means things won't change till the Packers' Aug. 26 home game.

And it still will be illegal to drink on the streets or while driving.


Fascists.

While on the subject, JB Doubtless points us to a paper by Radley Balko titled The Back Door to Prohibition: The New War on Social Drinking:

Taken together, the well-organized efforts of activists, law enforcement, and policymakers portend an approaching "back-door prohibition"--an effort to curb what some of them call the "environment of alcoholism"--instead of holding individual drinkers responsible for their actions. Policymakers should be wary of attempts to restrict choice when it comes to alcohol. Such policies place the external costs attributable to a small number of alcohol abusers on the large percentage of people who consume alcohol responsibly. Those efforts didn't work when enacted as a wide-scale, federal prohibition, and they are also ineffective and counterproductive when implemented incrementally.

1 comment:

  1. I wonder if drinking on the streets is still prohibited these days. How nice it would be to drink even if the snow are falling.

    ReplyDelete